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Increasing Economic Equality One City at a Time: Greensboro’s Story

Increasing Economic Equality One City at a Time: Greensboro’s Story

We asked Mayor Nancy Vaughan of Greensboro, NC to speak with us about what Greensboro is doing to become more economically inclusive.


“ Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future.” – John F. Kennedy

Leaders in Greensboro, North Carolina take the sentiment in this quote from John F. Kennedy to heart.

The community is increasingly diverse. With representatives from 98 countries, speaking 24 languages, Greensboro’s schools are more diverse than comparable urban areas in North Carolina.

Community demographics are changing in other ways as well. The city has a growing older population but workforce replacement by millennials is lagging.

Though unemployment is down and development activity and home values are increasing, the number of households in Greensboro at or below the poverty level has almost doubled since 2000.

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My First Week in Cleveland: Adapting to City Living and “Adulthood”

My First Week in Cleveland: Adapting to City Living and “Adulthood”

by Madison VanScoder, City Fellow, CEOs for Cities //

No, I am not a Cleveland fan JUST because of Lebron James…

At the end of junior year, many students do not know what they want to do with the rest of their life, or even what they want to do next month. This was me (and it still is me in some ways.) However, unlike most, I knew where I wanted to spend my summer, and generally how I wanted to spend it. Cleveland is a city very dear to me. My father and his entire family grew up in Cleveland, and since I attend Denison University, I visit quite often.

When I think of Cleveland, it brings nothing but good memories with my family to mind, such as visiting the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, having a lovely dinner at Blue Point Grille, and taking walks by the lake. I have known since freshman year of college that I wanted to live and work in Cleveland someday. This is why I was ecstatic to find a perfect internship at CEOs for Cities through the Summer on the Cuyahoga (SOTC) summer internship program. Since my acceptance in April, I had been awaiting this summer of new experiences and adventures. Now, here it is!

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Harnessing Downtown Development to Strengthen Nearby Neighborhoods

Harnessing Downtown Development to Strengthen Nearby Neighborhoods

A Connected City Lesson from Knoxville

By Jay Walljasper //

Knoxville is in an enviable position as the home of the University of Tennessee, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Scripps Networks Interactive (which runs many cable channels) – all of which attract well-educated people and drive the local economy. Knoxville is a green haven, featuring many parks and greenways as well as a 1,000-acre Urban Wilderness with 40 miles of hiking and biking trails inside the city limits. The Great Smoky Mountains National Parks is only 30 miles away. Downtown is thriving, with nearly every historical building redeveloped and block after block of ground-level retail shops animating the city center.

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Universal Design: Why Public Spaces Must be Accessible for All

Universal Design: Why Public Spaces Must be Accessible for All

By Steve Wright, Communications Manager, PlusUrbia //

Universal Design: “The design of products and environments to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design.
— Ronald L. Mace, the Center for Universal Design at North Carolina State University.

Universal Design – What It’s Not

Universal design means many things to many people. But anyone who has used a wheelchair for mobility can tell you what it is NOT:

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