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The Case Against Urban Corridors That Act Like High-Speed Highways

The Case Against Urban Corridors That Act Like High-Speed Highways

By PlusUrbia Design //

From the beginning of urbanized America, streets functioned to provide mobility in many ways:

People walked to work, trolley, horse-drawn then powered moved workers from factories and offices to home. Trains played a role in commutes. Bicycles incited a pedal power mobility craze for a while.
Then the automobile came along.

PlusUrbia_Calle Ocho Comparisonv2By the 1950s, roads became the sole domain of automobiles

The automotive industry even created the term “jay walking” and launched a campaign to demonize people on foot.

Sidewalks shrunk and beautifully landscaped medians were torn out to create more lanes for automobiles.

Trolley lines were ripped out and replaced with buses. But buses were devalued and branded as last ditch transportation for the unfortunate. Only the sedan was fit for the upwardly mobile middle class American.

Crosswalks were diminished. Those brazen enough to move around on two feet were seen as merely an impediment to moving more cars faster.

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Designed for the Future: 80 Practical Ideas for a Sustainable World

Designed for the Future: 80 Practical Ideas for a Sustainable World

by Jared Green, Author, Designed for the Future, published by Princeton Architectural Press (2015) //

In Designed for the Future: 80 Practical Ideas for a Sustainable World, I asked 80 leading urban planners, architects, landscape architects, and artists the same question: What gives you hope that a sustainable future is possible?

Many of these planning and design leaders pointed to cities as the answer.

There are a few reasons why cities give them such hope:

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