The Blog

Cities That Listen

Cities That Listen

by Lee Fisher, Senior Advisor to CEOs for Cities // 

“There’s battle lines being drawn. Nobody’s right when everybody’s wrong.”
– Buffalo Springfield, “For What It’s Worth”

 As we reflect on the recent presidential election and a new President, many enter this new year with mixed feelings of hope and anxiety. I want to share some thoughts about where we go from here.

Most of us live in a bubble. We engage in what is called “confirmation bias.” That is, we search for or interpret information in a way that confirms our own preconceptions. We actively seek out and assign more weight to evidence that confirms our views, and ignore or under weigh evidence that contradicts our views. This tendency to look for people and information that confirm our own views has been accelerated and enhanced by Google, Facebook, and other internet platforms who use the personal data they collect about us to tailor our online experiences.

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Biodiversity and Public Health

Biodiversity and Public Health

by Grace Cameron, Research Assistant, Healthiest Cities & Counties Challenge, CEOs for Cities //

Why we need biodiversity for more reasons than just beauty

Photo from Instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/BNhBrBWBv9o/As an environmental studies major, I am always looking for ways to connect the social to the scientific. Environmental studies is a broader version of environmental science, because it also includes elements of humanities, law, policies, and social science. In addition to appealing to my inner climate warrior, the study of the environment allows me to make those crafty social-scientific connections.

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February Change Maker — Ginny Seyferth

February Change Maker — Ginny Seyferth

How did you get involved in public relations? 
I started in Public Relations after college at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, moved to the oil industry with Amoco, then joined Amway Corporation’s media relations team before I opened my own firm 32 years ago. Today, our  firm is well recognized for our client support to manage issues, brand awareness and new product launches and we have a unique practice working with many Michigan companies on talent recruitment and retention. This is our work that ties to working with our City branding, and helping the City understand the attributes of a great brand.

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January Change Maker: Javier A. Soto

January Change Maker: Javier A. Soto

Javier A. Soto, President & CEO, The Miami Foundation // 

What do you see as the greatest policy issues that Miami must address in 2017?
In 2017, significant attention will be paid to transit issues. Explosive growth has impacted the ability to move in the city.

Equally important, but a longer-term issue that Miami is facing is the effect of sea level rise. We have already begun to see issues with this along the coast. We will need massive infrastructure changes in order to address the impact of climate change on the city.

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Big City Problems in Ohio’s Small Towns

Big City Problems in Ohio’s Small Towns

By John A. Begala //

Begala Photo 1
Small Hub Towns + Cities

For all the forces that conspire to separate and divide “big city” and “small town,” and all that is written about Ohio as a microcosm of the nation’s “culture wars,” Ohio’s small hub towns share many of the same characteristics and challenges as the state’s eight major cities.  In a recent report for The Center for Community Solutions, Big City Problems in Ohio’s Small Towns, I analyzed economic, social and health data for 47 of these communities, which are located in about half of Ohio’s 88 counties – towns that are centers of civic, social, and economic life for areas extending beyond their borders.

With a combined population of 1,170,570, or 10 percent of the state as a whole, communities included in the study have one or more major institutions that establish or contribute to its “hub” status.   Most are seats of county government (34 of 47); 20 are home to a four-year public or private college or university campus (five public and 15 private); and most (35) have at least one general hospital.

Here are some of the findings in the report:

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Improving City Engagement With Gamification

Improving City Engagement With Gamification

Your city has started making progress to become smarter, but now what? Making the strides to move your city forward is already a large task but once that is done, the next challenge begins — finding ways to engage businesses and your citizens.

Gamification is a relatively new term. Per the always trusted Merriam-Webster dictionary, gamification is “the process of adding games or gamelike elements to something (as a task) so as to encourage participation.”

Now, everyone from companies running trade-shows to large cities are looking towards gamification to present information in a new way.

Incorporating gamification in your city may seem to be a daunting task, but it can be an easy addition for you and can have benefits for your city’s businesses and citizens as well.

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December Change Makers: Pittsburgh Cluster

December Change Makers: Pittsburgh Cluster

All year we have profiled leaders who work tirelessly to make their cities more beautiful, successful, and inclusive. To close out 2016, we are featuring an entire city, rather than a single person – the gritty, tough, and fabulous Pittsburgh.

Though we wish we could have profiled every person we have the privilege to work with from the city, it would have been a book, rather than a blog.

Check out four leaders who are growing Pittsburgh:

Tracy Certo, Founder + Publisher, NEXTpittsburgh
William Generate Jr., J.D., President & CEO, Urban Innovation21
Nathan Martin, CEO, Deeplocal
Jane Werner, Executive Director, Children’s Museum


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Making Your City Smarter Isn’t as Hard as You Think

Making Your City Smarter Isn’t as Hard as You Think

Smart city is the new buzzword when it comes to urban development. Cities around the world are looking at ways to transform into the next technologically advanced city.

As was discussed in a previous blog, more people are moving into cities again and those people want information. And who can blame them? Our society now can share information rapidly. Information that was once limited to only small group of people now can be seen by thousands, all within a matter of seconds.

Of course, with every positive of the smart city and massive sharing of information there are the negatives. With the ever-growing big brother concerns that the world is turning into a 1984 society, people want to know that their safety is not of a concern.

So how can you take steps to make your city smarter all while keeping the best interests of your residents?

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November Change Maker: Denise Reid

November Change Maker: Denise Reid

Denise Reid, Executive Director, Mosaic and Workforce, Tulsa Regional Chamber //

“Always raise your hand, and raise your voice. Even if your voice shakes and you’re scared, raise your hand and use your voice. Be true to yourself.”

What’s your advice for the next generation of city change makers?

Be very intentional in understanding the people you have at the table, and understand who is missing. Go outside of your usual sphere of influence to make sure that you capture the creative capital needed to drive your city’s success.

Also, if you are at the table and you notice representation is missing, make the reach to be inclusive. If you don’t have someone to ask, figure out how to help others grow to be able to meet that need.

Finally, be sincere about the direction that you are going and the challenges that you face within your community. Be positive in your approach. If you own where you are and what is going on, you can more forward. For instance, if you don’t know how to build capacity, recognize that, ask for help, and learn from others.

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Seek First to Understand, then to be Understood

Seek First to Understand, then to be Understood

By Lee Fisher, Senior Advisor, CEOs for Cities //

This world is full of conflicts and full of things that cannot be reconciled, but there are moments when we can … reconcile and embrace the whole mess, and that’s what I mean by ‘Hallelujah.’” – Leonard Cohen  (via SNL’s Kate McKinnon)

On election night, no matter who you supported, most of us were surprised and many were shocked by the outcome. It is particularly difficult for Clinton supporters to understand how so many good people could have supported President-elect Trump given how many people were offended by his language in the campaign. Yes, a number of Trump supporters cheered his rhetoric. But I believe that many, maybe even most, Trump supporters voted for him despite his language, not because of it. For them, there was something in his populist, anti-establishment message that was much more important to them that his behavior. Trump’s message was that their lives matter. Many Trump supporters wanted to send the same message that Howard Beale, in the 1976 movie, Network, sent when he yelled, “I’m mad as hell and I’m not going to take this anymore.”  It’s worth noting that a number of people who voted for Barack Obama in 2012 voted for Trump. Youngstown, where Obama won by more than 20 points in 2012, was basically a draw. A number of counties that supported Obama in 2012 voted for Trump by wide margins.

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