Blog : Talent Dividend

Making Your City Smarter Isn’t as Hard as You Think

Making Your City Smarter Isn’t as Hard as You Think

Smart city is the new buzzword when it comes to urban development. Cities around the world are looking at ways to transform into the next technologically advanced city.

As was discussed in a previous blog, more people are moving into cities again and those people want information. And who can blame them? Our society now can share information rapidly. Information that was once limited to only small group of people now can be seen by thousands, all within a matter of seconds.

Of course, with every positive of the smart city and massive sharing of information there are the negatives. With the ever-growing big brother concerns that the world is turning into a 1984 society, people want to know that their safety is not of a concern.

So how can you take steps to make your city smarter all while keeping the best interests of your residents?

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The Economic Inclusion and Competitiveness Imperative

The Economic Inclusion and Competitiveness Imperative

By Johnathan M. HolifieldCo-founder, ScaleUp Partners //

During the last century, America’s position as a global economic leader was unaffected by the lack of contribution of disconnected Americans in key performance areas. We were the largely unchallenged global leaders, and U.S. economic competitiveness was assured despite less than optimal productivity from more than half our population. This is no longer the case. With unyielding global competition for jobs and opportunity, our nation cannot continue maintaining the walls that separate too many Americans from opportunities to successfully compete and prosper. Without an economy open to more contributions from more Americans (especially from disconnected populations; generally, women, African Americans, Latinos, and rural populations) we accept spectacular success for a few at the expense of a resilient, globally competitive national economy.

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Do Hard Things. Be Accessible.

Do Hard Things. Be Accessible.

by William Murdock, Executive Director, Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission & CEOs for Cities Columbus, Ohio Cluster Member //

CEOs for Cities. Indianapolis.  As an advocate of my favorite oft-compared Midwestern neighbor, Columbus and Central Ohio, this was my chance for inspiration with a side of learning how we were keeping up with the Joneses – and – with leaders and thinkers from across the country.  I was expecting to be challenged about how better to connect, to innovate, and to nourish our talent and our uniqueness. And #IndyCEO did not disappoint. My takeaways are simply put: Do hard things. Be accessible.

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Building Bridges Between People & the Skills They Need to Succeed

Building Bridges Between People & the Skills They Need to Succeed

by Stephen J. Langel, Chief Development Officer, NewBridge Cleveland Center for Arts & Technology //

NewBridge seeks to transform the lives of economically disadvantaged adults and youth in Greater Cleveland. For adults, NewBridge offers free career training programs that prepare graduates for in-demand, market-based careers. For youth, NewBridge provides free, cutting-edge after-school arts programs in ceramics, digital photography, film, graphic design and music recording and production in order to encourage students to stay in school and pursue post-secondary opportunities.

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Rebirth of a City Through the Millennial Perspective

Rebirth of a City Through the Millennial Perspective

by Daniel Regan, Vice President, Kanbar Properties //

A little over a decade ago, Tulsa experienced something of a renaissance. I had just moved back to my hometown after living in Costa Rica for a year, and it was clear that the community’s focus had shifted. More exciting was the fact that this change was being led by an energetic group of young leaders who recognized that WE have the ability to shape our lovely metropolitan riverfront community into whatever it is we want. A novel idea began to take hold – “placemaking” (even if we didn’t know what it was at the time) was a participatory activity.

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Tackling Low Wages and Gentrification in a Livable City

Tackling Low Wages and Gentrification in a Livable City

By Jay Walljasper //

Asheville traveled pretty far down the same path as most American cities in the 1970s and 80s with a dwindling downtown and booming suburbs. All the boarded up buildings gave rise to a proposal to tear down eleven square blocks downtown and construct a state-of-the-art shopping mall. Plans fell through and the mall was build elsewhere, hurting downtown even more in the short run but setting the state for a remarkable revival.

Downtown Asheville today – with its wealth of restored art deco architecture and an almost absence of chain stores – rivals the Blue Ridge Mountains and Biltmore mansion as a tourist draw, says Robin Cape of the Asheville Buncombe Sustainable Community Inititative and former city council member. The historical buildings foster lively streetlife, plentiful small businesses and a flourishing arts scene. An old Woolworth store has been repurposed as Woolworth Walk – a collection of galleries featuring photography, paintings, jewelry and music. You can visit artists’ studios in the nearby River Arts District.

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