Blog : Economic Inclusion

What’s the Role of Economic Development Organizations in Inclusive Growth?

What’s the Role of Economic Development Organizations in Inclusive Growth?

Cross-posted from Regional Growth Strategies blog.  By Pete Carlson, President, Regional Growth Strategies //

Recently, I had the opportunity to spend a day with local economic development leaders from across the country to explore the role of economic development organizations (EDOs) in achieving more inclusive growth. The strong interest in the meeting suggest that a lot of EDOs are wrestling with this question.

I, too, have been wrestling with this question for some time now, and I’ve come to a few conclusions about what works and what doesn’t that might be useful to others heading down this path.

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Building Bridges Between People & the Skills They Need to Succeed

Building Bridges Between People & the Skills They Need to Succeed

by Stephen J. Langel, Chief Development Officer, NewBridge Cleveland Center for Arts & Technology //

NewBridge seeks to transform the lives of economically disadvantaged adults and youth in Greater Cleveland. For adults, NewBridge offers free career training programs that prepare graduates for in-demand, market-based careers. For youth, NewBridge provides free, cutting-edge after-school arts programs in ceramics, digital photography, film, graphic design and music recording and production in order to encourage students to stay in school and pursue post-secondary opportunities.

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Economic Opportunities through Education (EcO)

Economic Opportunities through Education (EcO)

Creating a Collaborative Regional System of Lifelong Learning by Aligning Educational & Training Offerings with Economic Opportunity

by Stephanie Weber, Marketing & Outreach Director, Ec015 //

Southeast Indiana Regional Demographics

  • Ten counties
  • Mainly rural
  • 300,000 population
  • Population growth rate is relatively flat and will be in the future
  • Nearly one in three people work in advanced manufacturing. Manufacturing is the top employment sector in seven of the ten counties
  • Average wages for advanced manufacturing jobs in Southeast Indiana is $44,000, which is 25% higher than the next largest employment sector
  • Healthcare represents 10% of the workforce

For this very rural region in Southeast Indiana, focusing on talent and educational initiatives has proven to be the most effective way of insuring that a higher percentage of our population will be successful in achieving postsecondary attainment and increases the base of highly skilled workers Southeast Indiana has to offer to employers.

 

Dream It. Do It. Southeast Indiana
Dream It. Do It. Champions and Student Ambassadors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Growth & Opportunity (Emphasis on the Ampersand)

Growth & Opportunity (Emphasis on the Ampersand)

by Jeff Linton, Senior Vice President, Corporate Communications and Community Relations, Forest City Enterprises, a member of the Fund for Our Economic Future //

A Growth & Opportunity Approach to Economic Development

At the Fund for Our Economic Future, you hear a lot about Growth & Opportunity as a driving strategy and a key to strengthening Northeast Ohio’s economy. Sounds like a good thing, right? Who doesn’t like growth? Who wouldn’t want there to be more opportunity?

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Increasing Economic Equality One City at a Time: Greensboro’s Story

Increasing Economic Equality One City at a Time: Greensboro’s Story

We asked Mayor Nancy Vaughan of Greensboro, NC to speak with us about what Greensboro is doing to become more economically inclusive.


“ Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future.” – John F. Kennedy

Leaders in Greensboro, North Carolina take the sentiment in this quote from John F. Kennedy to heart.

The community is increasingly diverse. With representatives from 98 countries, speaking 24 languages, Greensboro’s schools are more diverse than comparable urban areas in North Carolina.

Community demographics are changing in other ways as well. The city has a growing older population but workforce replacement by millennials is lagging.

Though unemployment is down and development activity and home values are increasing, the number of households in Greensboro at or below the poverty level has almost doubled since 2000.

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My First Week in Cleveland: Adapting to City Living and “Adulthood”

My First Week in Cleveland: Adapting to City Living and “Adulthood”

by Madison VanScoder, City Fellow, CEOs for Cities //

No, I am not a Cleveland fan JUST because of Lebron James…

At the end of junior year, many students do not know what they want to do with the rest of their life, or even what they want to do next month. This was me (and it still is me in some ways.) However, unlike most, I knew where I wanted to spend my summer, and generally how I wanted to spend it. Cleveland is a city very dear to me. My father and his entire family grew up in Cleveland, and since I attend Denison University, I visit quite often.

When I think of Cleveland, it brings nothing but good memories with my family to mind, such as visiting the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, having a lovely dinner at Blue Point Grille, and taking walks by the lake. I have known since freshman year of college that I wanted to live and work in Cleveland someday. This is why I was ecstatic to find a perfect internship at CEOs for Cities through the Summer on the Cuyahoga (SOTC) summer internship program. Since my acceptance in April, I had been awaiting this summer of new experiences and adventures. Now, here it is!

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Neighborhood Building in Memphis: A Strategy of Hope

Neighborhood Building in Memphis: A Strategy of Hope

By Jarrett Spence, J.D. Candidate, University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, Neighborhood Preservation Clinic  //

The Executive Inn

For years, one of the very first sights to greet people entering Memphis from our airport was the Executive Inn. This time last year, the hotel – which was owned by an anonymous corporation in another state – was one of the most pernicious blighted properties in town. The exterior walls had literally fallen off, revealing a three-story derelict dollhouse covered in graffiti and garbage.

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Increasing Economic Equality One City at a Time: Portland’s Story

Increasing Economic Equality One City at a Time: Portland’s Story

We asked Erin Flynn, Associate Vice President for Strategic Partnerships at Portland State University to speak with us about what Portland is doing to become more economically inclusive. //


The Challenge:

Historically, Portland has been a predominantly white city with limited racial and ethnic diversity. But the city’s demographics are changing dramatically and business and civic leaders are grappling with the challenges and opportunities presented by growing diversity. While 80 percent of the population between the ages of 50 and 64 are white only 56% of the population between the ages of 5 and 19 are white. The majority of the non-white, youth population is Latino. While Portland has been a magnet for young, educated millenials, it faces a considerable challenge to educate and skill up its own minority, youth population. Forty-two percent of PSU’s freshman class this year is minority and/or first generation students.

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